MIDI Instrument Maps

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Re: midi instrument maps

Postby ccherrett » Sat Aug 09, 2008 1:35 am

Hi guys,

Ok so after a long time of figuring this out I have the following:

- Instrument Database
- Midimap in Linuxsampler
- Midimap in Rosegarden

So all is well!

Now do open a channel for each bank in fantasia to give me access to the samples in Rosegarden and tell each channel what midimap to use?

I am not quite sure what the next step is :)

Thanks!
Christopher Cherrett
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Re: midi instrument maps

Postby dahnielson » Sun Aug 10, 2008 10:59 am

ccherrett wrote:Ok so after a long time of figuring this out I have the following:

- Instrument Database
- Midimap in Linuxsampler
- Midimap in Rosegarden

Now do open a channel for each bank in fantasia to give me access to the samples in Rosegarden and tell each channel what midimap to use?


* How many midimaps do you have? LinuxSampler can have several maps arbitrary assigned to sample channels (which in turn can be arbitrary connected to midi-ports and -channels), while Rosegarden can only handle one map per device, so it's usually easier to stick to only one big midimap used by every channel. And yes, you need to tell every sample channel what midimap to use (just as you need to load the correct bank for a device in Rosegarden).

* When working with program changes: open the same number of sample channels in LinuxSampler as midi channels/tracks in Rosegarden. But don't get fooled and think you can only have 16! Just create additional midi ports in LS and you can have as many as you like. :D
Anders Dahnielson

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Re: midi instrument maps

Postby ccherrett » Sun Aug 10, 2008 1:37 pm

Hi dahnielson,

I am still working out how many maps I want but after some very successful experiments tonight, I just have one more day of planning and all should work just the way I need!

I will keep you up to date with what happens.

Thanks again for all the help!
Christopher Cherrett
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Re: MIDI Instrument Maps

Postby tuxphobia » Sat Jul 04, 2009 4:44 pm

i too was abandoned with my cube when vienna turned away from giga, i have gone mac since then and its great to finally see a reason to learn linux :)

i got an amd 4core 8 gb ram

- which is the fastest linux distro for orchestration?
- what apps do i need to download and install (ill ask a friend of mine he'll help me)
- is it possible for you a fellow composer to share their sequencer setup/mappings so i can try that right away?
- can i route the audio+MIDI over lan to my mac running logic?
- is it possible to run my beloved stylus rmx in the same linux?

im a newb, excuse me, but im a quick and eager study and i think ive found a place to develop my linux skills :)
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Re: MIDI Instrument Maps

Postby Alex » Sat Jul 04, 2009 6:03 pm

tuxphobia, i'll try and answer at least some of your questions.


"which is the fastest linux audio distro?"

That's a tough one, that depends on how much effort you put in. Ubuntu, Fedora, and Debian are desktop variants that have versions for making music. Be aware with these distros, that you will face a challenge, and posssibly a conflict between the Jack audio server, and the pulseaudio domestic server that is packaged with these distros by default. There is a wealth of angst on the interlink, detailing the challenges of taking this path. You'll need to decide if your music making box is dedicated to just making and recording music, or as a dual use box, where you wish to play games, do the youtube shuffle, etc...
If you're building a dedicated audio box, then:
My weapon of choice is Gentoo, using what's called the pro-audio overlay. Gentoo can be configured and tweaked to a fine degree for music production.
If you still want a debian based distro, that's fairly easy to setup and use (more or less plug and play), then you might be interested in 64Studio version 3.

"What apps?"

There's a big collection, again depending which way you jump. Google for linux audio apps,and you'll get a long list from which to choose.

"sharing maps."

I wish we could, but we setup maps according to personal wishes, and even 2 VSL users will have different maps.
so it's worth thinking about what you want, and where you want it, then building up maps of your own. Perhaps one day the sample lib manufacturers will have the courage to embrace linux as a viable option (and i can assure you it is) and build generic maps for their products, that users on all platforms can use. Given the surge towards dedicated players, i don't think we'll ever see this day.

"can i route audio/midi over lan?"

Yes you can. You'll need to install JACK on all your machines, choose a master, and make the others slaves. See http://www.jackaudio.org for details. This sound server uses a protocol called Netjack to manage the streaming.

"My beloved Stylus RMX"

No idea. It's a win app that may or mat not run in an emulation app called WINE. Go to the wine website, and check the application state matrix to see if anyone has tried and tested Stylus in the Wine environment, and what result they ended up with.


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